Reviews, reviews, reviews. They matter a great deal

Reviews, reviews, reviews. They matter a great deal

There’s a reason why authors keep nagging about reviews

1.11% is a number that is greatly frustrating me. It’s the percentage of reviews I’ve received last year. Roughly one in a hundred book buyers actually left a review. In reality, the number is lower because some reviews are left by reviewers who work with advance review copies, i.e. books they don’t pay for. The low number of reviews isn’t just frustrating for me, it’s a source of great consternation for most authors out there. A couple of years ago, when Disease came out, I had been in touch with several Alzheimer’s associations around the world, and one of them, in Australia, said they’d be happy to mention the book to their members, as soon as I’d reached one hundred reviews. I got to thirty-one during that release cycle, having to work hard for every single review.

Why reviews matter

Disease was greatly received by the audiences, but after I had worked hard for those first reviews, they've pretty much stopped, even though the book still sells.

Disease was greatly received by the audiences, but after I had worked hard for those first reviews, they’ve pretty much stopped, even though the book still sells.

The sad truth is that reviews matter. For many reasons. Of course, I could tell you how much I love to read them, but I won’t lie to you. I usually don’t, simply because I’m unaware of them. Also because I have thin skin (I share this trait with most artists) and a negative review can ruin my mood for days. If someone emails me a positive review I walk on cloud #7 instead. Some readers think that authors learn from reviews. With all due respect: don’t overestimate your importance. I say this in all humility. That is not the job of a review, nor the job of a reviewer. By the time a book is released, it’s polished and looks exactly the way author and publisher intend it to be. Nothing left to change, except for some sad and overlooked typos. If you feel you need to teach an author a lesson, try to get involved during the alpha-, beta-, editing or proofreading stage. I know some freelance editors who itch to critique a finished novel as a way to pitch their services. I also know editors who have killed for less after having read such reviews. Just saying.

But reviews matter. The primary reason is commercial. The more reviews a book garners on a site, the more likely it will be highlighted by the site’s algorithms. There are differences, of course, but many reviews are always better than few or none. That is why they matter to the authors and publishers of the world. This isn’t just true for books, but any product sold online, and the main reason why we’re all asked for reviews, be it after a hotel night, a product purchase, by the apps on our phones and–duh!–authors and publishers.

I hate to leave a bad review

The cover for my new novel Deceit, book two in The Golden One. Cover by Natasha Snow. Reviews will help boost this novel in its fantasy category.

The cover for my new novel Deceit, book two in The Golden One. Cover by Natasha Snow. Reviews will help boost this novel in its fantasy category.

I think readers who are afraid to leave a bad or negative review make a big mistake. Firstly: if a book is full of plot holes, or poorly formatted, or if the story just doesn’t make sense, don’t you think other readers deserve a word of caution before they invest their money? It’s so easy to publish books today. Upload your word document, slap on a cover and you’re pretty much done. No editing, no proofing, no typesetting.

Equally, if you do not like a perfectly well-crafted book, I think people deserve to know. Let’s face it: there is NO book that is for everyone. If you don’t like that a book includes e.g. a descriptive sex scene, this is great customer information. It might actually attract readers who enjoy that sort of reading. It doesn’t mean it’s a bad book, but simply that it’s a book that wasn’t for you. You might not enjoy lengthy descriptions of locales in a story or how the dialogue is structured or, or, or… Someone else might love that. I hope that makes sense.

Finally, consider this: as much as I love a five-star review, and I am personally super lucky to get amazing reviews (the ones that I receive), but look at it from your point of view, as a reader. When you look for a product that is adorned with five-star reviews only, doesn’t that make you the least bit suspicious? Aren’t you more at ease when you see that there is a mix of reviews? Sure, we all want the majority of those to be favorable, but all of them? Which isn’t to mean that you should start to hand out one-star reviews, but rather than not leaving a review, wouldn’t a two- or three-star review be better? To balance all those five-star ones?

I don’t review because I’m not good at writing…

I get this a lot from people I talk to about reviews. Thing is, you don’t have to be a writer or author to review. Simply say what you like about a book, what was your favorite aspect? What didn’t work for you? Maybe explain why? I understand that many readers want to do the author justice, but remember this: your review isn’t for the author. It’s for other readers. Keep it simple, keep it short. There is no need for a review to be several paragraphs long. Yes, some reviews are long, they look at a great many aspects of a book, and being a reviewer myself, I can often write a thousand words or more in my reviews here. But let’s be honest: on Amazon, nobody’s going to read a review that is longer than 200 words. They might read the first couple of sentences and then move on to the next. Our attention span is limited. We look at the stars and then why those stars were awarded (or not.) Simple as that.

I used to review, but then got flak from the author

First, allow me to apologize on behalf of all authors, and I don’t give a shit whether they allow me to or not. To criticize a review is one of the taboos I hold dear in my job as a writer. So what if you get a bad review (see above.) It’s not a criticism of you as a person. I know, I know. Authors are sensitive flowers and read on a wrong day (heater broke, the youngest kid was sent to the principal’s office, car totaled) we are all extra sensitive to it. BUT, readers are entitled to their views in peace and quiet. And as authors, we have no right to go after them. And sadly, it happens.

But instead of giving up on reviewing altogether, please consider just sticking the middle finger to that particular individual. Continue reviewing other books you read. To my fellow authors, I say this: if a review rubs you the wrong way, for whatever reason, look the other way. Talk to a friend or a fan and let them pick you up from the gutter of your self-loathing (we’ve all been there.) But never, ever, take your frustration out on a reader. We all end up losing.

Reviews matter, they are probably the single best thing you can do for an author besides buying their work

I can’t stress this enough. Reviews are absolutely critical and on sites like Amazon where most Americans and Britons these days look for “stuff” (regardless of what it is), having reviews is essential to a book’s visibility. So if you have a moment, please go back to your orders and review past book purchases. We authors will be forever grateful for it. This is even more important for authors who are not published by the “big five” where marketing funds will make sure to highlight those books to potential readers. Indie authors and authors with small presses just don’t have that luxury. Reviews and sales are the only way to make a dent, to be seen among the fifty-plus million books that are on sale on Amazon. And without reviews, no/fewer sales.

Most people buy their books on Amazon. Like that fact or not, but a fact it is. Review there. Or leave it wherever you buy your book. If you have the time and feel inclined to, reviews on BookBub or Gollumreads are appreciated, even though the “average” reader doesn’t frequent those sites. They are geared toward very frequent readers, fans.

I just can’t…

 

Patreon is a service to help artists find people to keep creating their art through crowdfunding.

Patreon is a service to help artists find people to keep creating their art through crowdfunding.

I get it. And you are in good company. Unfortunately for us authors. But even if you can’t bring yourself to review because of bad experiences, lack of time or just can’t find the right words, there are still things you can do to help an author: why not recommend a book you like to a friend or two? Word of mouth is the best marketing method there is (hence reviews…) and if every reader were to get two more people to buy a book, most authors would have fewer reasons to complain about declining book sales.

 

If you are active on social media, and you see a post by an author you like, heart/like it. No need to comment, but those darned algorithms react to reactions. It doesn’t even take a second and you’ve done a good deed. Share, comment, encourage. Write your favorite author a letter/email and I guarantee you there will be smiles on the other end. Most of us who do not support ourselves financially with our writing “live and breathe” those messages. They truly make our days.

If all of that isn’t for you, but you have money for a couple of lattes to spare, consider sponsoring an artist through sites like Patreon. I just started my page after long consideration and I’ve just written a post explaining why contributions make such a big difference for us.

Thank you!

Please don’t read this post as a “lecture”. I have had several conversations over the past weeks and months on this subject with readers, and I’ve recently attended a seminar which really drove home the importance of reviews for me. Hence the above. I felt I wanted to address some of the concerns and provide perspective.

I would also like to say thank you: thank you to those who buy my books and others, to readers who reach out and care, reviewers and my first patrons. Art isn’t primarily about money. Every true artist keeps saying that, but the fact of the matter is that “love” and “exposure” don’t pay utility bills and they don’t keep us from maxing out credit cards.

Every author’s life is different, our circumstances vary and we do what we do for a great many reasons. I can only speak for my own. Thank you for supporting us, the arts, for allowing us to enrich human culture, to facilitate our continued growth and development, particularly “in these dark and troubling times”.

Thank you,

Hans M Hirschi
Author

Why I changed my mind about Patreon

Why I changed my mind about Patreon

Another post about money? My bad…

Money is always on my mind. Maybe it’s genetic. I am Swiss after all, and we have perfected both money and banks (and we love to take it from you…) However, on a serious note, money is a constant headache for artists. It’s a topic for everybody these days, as our societies drift apart with a select few having more and more while the vast majority gets by on less and less. For artists, to earn a living with their art is increasingly difficult. I see many reasons for that.

The democratization of the arts

There used to be a time when humanity was busy putting food in their mouths, clothes on their bodies and finding shelter. Most never got beyond that basic level on Maslov’s pyramid. The few who always had it all were also the ones who were patrons of the arts, and there are many famous examples, from the popes in Rome to e.g. the Medici family in Florence or the royalty around the world who would employ bards, painters, sculptors or storytellers. Even authors were often supported by nobility in their art and often had to flee, head over heel, as their ideas weren’t always appreciated by their patrons. One of my personal favorites, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, is one such example.

Amazon is a key player in the democratization of publishing, but also inadvertently destroying the ability of most authors to ever make a living.

Amazon is a key player in the democratization of publishing, but also inadvertently destroying the ability of most authors to ever make a living.

In a way, the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries are the oddities for writers. Suddenly, there were writers who were able to make a living, thanks to publishers, newspapers, and magazines. With the advent of Amazon and self-publishing in the late twentieth century, publishing a book is suddenly a tool for everybody. Publishers, literary agents were no longer the gatekeepers they once were. Within just a couple of decades, things have drastically changed and with over fifty million books available to readers, and the latter decreasing thanks to the Internet and the increase in podcasts, a change in the pace of life, it’s getting increasingly difficult to sell books. Add the decrease in the price of books and you have a lethal cocktail. Mind you, the same is true for music. They are about ten years ahead of us, as their price decline started a lot sooner. The biggest acts these days don’t earn their money with records but tours/concerts. Many have claimed for years that the same is true for writers. And in a way it is, because the only writers who really make a dent these days in terms of “bestsellers” are celebrities. Today, you must be famous to get a publishing deal. You don’t achieve fame because you write great books.

The role of Patreon

Patreon is a service to help artists find people to keep creating their art through crowdfunding.

Patreon is a service to help artists find people to keep creating their art through crowdfunding.

Having to fall back on a patronage service (crowdsourcing) feels like defeat. When I first decided against Patreon more than two years ago, it was for a fear of being pushed in a certain direction by my potential patrons and a fear that I might not be able to keep them happy, that the content creation for Patreon might take too much time. Let me add that as a European, completely unaccustomed to crowdsourcing, a healthy dose of shame also played a major role. Begging just seems so strange.

Let’s face it. If you write in English and the U.S. is your major market, you need to abide by the rules that apply to that market. I’ve tried to behave “European” for the past six years and it’s not done me any favors. My personal integrity may be intact, but my family economy isn’t. There are boundaries I’m not willing to cross. I won’t steal art, I pay for the content I use, be it music, imagery and film snippets for trailers. imagery for my covers, I pay my cover creators and I pay for the guys who narrate my audiobooks and the illustrator of my children’s books.

Patreon fills a gap here. They help us recoup some of the cost of our content creation. Crowdsourcing is a thing in the U.S., be it for healthcare (in absence of public solutions) or even a funeral. Here in Sweden, there are plenty of grants for authors to apply for, but writing in English, those don’t apply to me. Like I said, if you play on a different market, different rules apply. Unfortunately, it seems that the most successful people on Patreon are the ones who need it the least, i.e. the famous ones. That is part of the rule of the game these days.

The cost of being an author

They say that publishing a book is free, and that is true, of course. But what book will that be? Relying on free images to create a cover, relying on friends or one’s own talent. I’ve seen far too many such covers, and in nine of ten such examples, they fall short. Self-publishers who do not pay for professional editing or proofreaders, and who typeset their own books. I’ve seen those books, and far too many fall into the DNF category. As interesting as a story may be if it is hidden by typos, plot holes, and atrocious typesetting, readers will return them to Amazon for a refund.

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Conventions are necessary for an author to attend, as we are in a day and age where our brand is centered around who we are, less on what we create.

I spend 50% of my earnings to have my book edited, proofed and typeset by my publisher. I’m lucky. Most traditionally published authors earn royalties below 30%. I pay for my own covers (roughly $200 per book) because I am picky about that and because I’ve done my own covers even before I joined Beaten Track. They do have a say in covers though since their earnings also depend on a successful cover.

Audiobooks are becoming increasingly important as people read less and less. Our attention span is decreasing, we spend more time consuming shorter and shorter bits and pieces of information and fewer people set aside the time to read. They will still listen to an audiobook on their commute though, or while cleaning the house, etc. There are different models for paying for that, which again includes a cover, but the most expensive part is the narrator, and the three books I’ve done so far have cost me between $600 and $2,500. I get about $9 per book purchased. You do the math…

My children’s books require illustrations, and the artist who so brilliantly does them for me also wants to be paid. Each illustration clocks at $75 or more, depending on the artist. I just recently commissioned a new cover illustration for one of my books and prices ranged from $175 to almost $1,000.

Have I mentioned conventions and signings? Flights, hotels, paying for tables there? The cost of buying books and having them shipped. Yes, I usually sell well, but not always. I recently attended a book fair and ended up selling one book, but I still had to make sure to have them all there. It’s a hit or miss situation, you never know how well you’ll do. But nobody is sending me books for free and no postal service ships without charging… And no amount of book sales will ever cover the cost of transatlantic flights and hotels.

But that’s not all, there’s my website, the cost for my newsletter ($30/month), the cost for marketing campaigns, BookBubs, etc. It never ends, and with an ever-decreasing budget, the likelihood of breaking through the noise is diminishing rapidly and no nude selfies would ever be able to change that…

Artists deserve to be paid

Still one of my favorite covers. Natasha Snow, one of my cover artists, deserves every penny I pay her.

Still one of my favorite covers. Natasha Snow, one of my cover artists, deserves every penny I pay her.

I think that goes without saying. I cannot pay my groceries with “exposure” (sorry, HuffPost), and I’ve stopped writing for websites who don’t pay me. I think the same applies to the artists I work with. I know they have invoices to pay, I know they do great work and deserve every penny they get.

If you look at the above, you quickly realize that I would have to sell thousands and thousands of copies of books to even break even. Alas, I am not. Not even close. Note that this is in no way a complaint. It’s just a fact. I don’t have the money to advertise for my books, and to become visible among the fifty million books on Amazon is simply a question of investing a ton of money, or luck. So far the latter has also eluded me. I could compromise. I could use standard cheap covers, but what would that do to my visibility on Amazon and elsewhere?

I could use a narrator based simply on a profit-share scheme, but what is the likelihood they’d help me again if they realize that they won’t make any money? And do I want twenty narrators for my different books, twenty disgruntled people badmouthing me for not selling? And would readers/listeners appreciate a new voice for every book?

Why I created a Patreon page

I have a business that has been in charge of my publishing of audiobooks and a couple of my titles (Common Sense and Dads.) Over the years, that business has accumulated losses, losses that my husband and I have covered with our own money. I can’t even say how much money we’ve invested to keep that company afloat. It’s irrelevant because whether I run my writing through a company or privately as a hobby, the invoices would still need paying.

But I’ve noticed that around us, things are getting more and more expensive, while my sales peaked in 2015. Yes, 2018 was better, a lot better than the disaster year of 2017, but still. I’m miles away from even paying the cost of my books. And unless lady luck intervenes, I’ll never be able to make a living as a writer. Unfortunately, getting a day job isn’t easy either when you’re fifty-two years old in Sweden. I’m either over-qualified or too old, the former a euphemism for the latter. I’m stuck between a rock and a hard place. I have nothing to lose.

Which is why I’ve finally decided to create a Patreon page. Nothing’s changed on the surface since I published that first post in 2017, but I’ve tried to find ways to mitigate the amount of work I will have to put in creating content for Patreon, and I’ve talked to a lot of people on Patreon about their experiences.

Have a look, please provide feedback

My Patreon page went live yesterday, and I’m thrilled to already have a patron. *smiles* I have created a few tiers from $5 to $100 (overly optimistic perhaps) a month with content I hope will appeal to potential patrons. That content can always change. So please have a look and let me know what you think. I’d be happy to listen and learn. I’m new at this, and yet I’m not because I’ve always had a patron, my father. Without him, I would have had to give up on writing years ago and really on unemployment benefits (since I can’t get a job at my age. Just in case you wonder…) At least this way, I feel that I am making a positive change to society with my art and keeping myself busy, too. Only time will tell, if Patreon is going to make a difference in my life or not.

You can find my page here: https://www.patreon.com/hansmhirschi

Thank you for having a look. Feel free to provide feedback here.

Hans M Hirschi

Author branding: who are you? What do you stand for?

Author branding: who are you? What do you stand for?

Branding is more than a logotype or a genre to write in…

I’m still thinking about the breakfast seminar I attended yesterday… Bear with me. In it, the number 76 was imprinted (branded?) on us. 76% of all marketing efforts of companies selling primarily online was aimed at strengthening their brand, NOT to promote specific products or getting people to buy stuff. Research from traditional marketing suggests that number be 60%. So why do online brands focus more on branding? The answer is that people buy your goods on marketplaces that do not bear your logo, places like Alibaba, Amazon et al. For me, as an author, I can add B&N, Apple, Smashwords, Kobo and all the many bookstores around the world. NONE of them bear my name (duh!) and none of them care the least about me. In order to make a dent, to be recognized, we need to focus on our brand image.

What is a brand?

According to Wikipedia, a brand is, I quote:

A brand is an overall experience of a customer that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer. Brands are used in business, marketing, and advertising. […]

Branding is a set of marketing and communication methods that help to distinguish a company or products from competitors, aiming to create a lasting impression in the minds of customers. The key components that form a brand’s toolbox include a brand’s identity, brand communication (such as by logos and trademarks), brand awareness, brand loyalty, and various branding (brand management) strategies. Many companies believe that there is often little to differentiate between several types of products in the 21st century, and therefore branding is one of a few remaining forms of product differentiation.

Here’s what I take from this for me, an author; words like customer experience, but also identity, communication, loyalty, and awareness. But also the last sentence, which is how I began the post. At the seminar, we were told that we live in an age where there is a bigger supply than demand. How can I make sure that a reader chooses my books among fifty million to choose from?

How to approach branding

One of the many swag items I produced.

One of the many swag items I produced. This coffee mug is the most expensive item, either sold at cons or given to those who buy several books in bulk.

I do not have many resources for branding. There are anecdotal stories about how a book reaches a big audience. One of the stories I recall hearing relates to the first English translation of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Apparently (I can’t vouch if this is true or just an urban tale, so take it with a pinch of salt), the English publisher passed out thousands of free copies of the book in the London subway to create a buzz for the book. If true, it certainly worked, as the Millennium Trilogy has since been adapted for the silver screen and expanded into additional books ghost-written after the author’s death. A lot of money involved. That would be considered an example of product branding. Who cares about a dead author? Not much to work with except of course legends (there is a certain amount of that going on here in Sweden, but that’s beside the point here)

I don’t have the money to give away thousands of printed copies of my books in the subway. I have tried to move books using BookBub, and in both instances, a book of mine was accepted, it worked out nicely. however, and I think this is critical, while both books became bestsellers,  the number of reviews garnered was low. Of fifteen-thousand plus copies sold of The Opera House, only thirty-five actually reviewed the book. Mind you, great reviews, but still. 0.0067% is a miserable conversion rate. My second Bookbub with Disease didn’t fare any better. While Bookbub will get you great sales numbers (at considerable cost!), it will not lift your book in the long run due to miserable conversion rates.

My (lacking) approach

So what else can you do?

The official logo of author Hans M Hirschi

The official logo of author Hans M Hirschi

What do I do? Swag is something that comes to mind, a logotype. I began creating swag in 2015 for conventions I attended (another branding aspect.) The logo came in 2016. I’m not a huge fan of swag and I haven’t produced anything for two years. I still have pens left over (the most sensible thing done) as well as buttons, key chains, and coffee mugs.

I have never really done my homework. Yes, I gave the designer of my logo instructions, but if you look at my author logo you may not necessarily get to the same associations about the brand I want you to. Then again, what logo ever does that? My logo is fairly masculine, despite the “crown” (which stems from my nickname “The Queen of Unconventional Happy Endings“) I still like my logo and even though I might wish to alter my brand image, I believe I can achieve that with the existing logo. Others have. Besides, I’m a writer. My logo isn’t the culmination of my brand. It’s only a facet of it.

So what will I need to do?

So many faces, so many expressions. Who am I? Which best expresses my core values? My brand?

So many faces, so many expressions. Who am I? Which best expresses my core values? My brand?

I need to sit down and figure out what I actually want my brand to signify, what I want it to imply. What emotions do I wish to evoke? What is it I want readers to associate me with? How broad do I want my branding to be (which speaks to my target audience), how do I communicate these values and emotions? I have a lot of work to do, and it’s not made easier by the fact that I have very little in terms of money to play with. If I could’ve asked my hosts from yesterday for help, I could easily spend tens of thousands of dollars in fees (before spending a dime on actual marketing) to answer these (and other) questions and reach success.

I remember a question that was put before me once by the GM of one of our countries in a company I worked for: what conversion rate do you envision? I was asking for funds for a campaign. He expected a 1:100 conversion rate, i.e. for every dollar spent he wanted 100 dollars ROI. Maybe he was just yanking my chains, maybe he was being realistic. At the time, I turned around and walked away. I barely knew how to compute ROI on training (different topic altogether) and we never saw the revenue of any sales. But that was then. Given that most of my books sell for five dollars, and we get maybe 50-60% of that, which I share equally with my publisher, I get about $1.25 per book sold. You do the math of how many books I’d have to sell to even afford a campaign, not to mention getting to that kind of ROI. We’re talking hundreds of thousands of ebooks. Compared to the 1,800 books sold last year. Yeah. Whatever approach I choose, it better be dirt cheap.

I have some ideas…

I have homework to do. Once I have figured out what kind of emotions I want my author brand to evoke, I need to work out how to communicate those. I need to think about how my genre-jumping (which doesn’t make things easier) can be aligned with the brand. And then I need to figure out how to communicate that to my readers (existing and potential ones.) Followed by actions on how I can convert that into sold books. I have ideas but need to carve out time to actually work on that. And I feel I really need to begin to focus on that work. I’ve always enjoyed marketing and PR work, although (in my previous life as a training and development executive) I used to have a fairly nice budget to achieve my goals. No longer. I may have to rely on guerilla tactics…

A speck of light in the universe: how can readers find me?

A speck of light in the universe: how can readers find me?

How can readers find my work?

I attended a breakfast seminar this morning, getting up way early to go downtown. The seminar was organized by the Dentsu Aegis Network in Gothenburg and it was all about the rumored, coming, pending, threatened (I could go on, you know…) arrival of Amazon on the Swedish market. This has been talked about for years, but only last year (or so) did they get the .se domain and rumors have it that they’re working on distribution and/or have that finalized. Whether or not they’ll open up, that’s a different question. Doesn’t stop companies from selling services or others from wondering about how to tackle the arrival of such a disruptive force in e-commerce.

Author, what are you doing there?

My logo, part of my branding

My logo, part of my branding. But hardly enough.

First, as a poor author, it would be stupid to say no to a free breakfast. Thanks, Dentsu Aegis! 😉 Second, duh! Amazon, right? I mean, where do I make most of my money (what little I make) if not through Amazon? I’ve been working with them since 2013, and even though I often want to pull out every last hair on my head, I realize that they ARE the most important sales channel for me. So I was curious to learn more about how I might improve my presence on Amazon, potentially learn about advertising as well as tips and tricks on how to beat the system. I left disappointed. The seminar wasn’t geared toward authors who possess no marketing budgets from which Dentsu Aegis could’ve recovered the cost for my morning coffee and sandwich. I already knew that before sitting down.

However, I did learn some interesting things, even though I qualify as “vendor” to Amazon and they fulfill everything. Things like the fact that most people never click beyond the first page of results, which is frustrating, particularly when you write queer literature, and you compete with naked torsos and Michelle Obama’s biography (WTF?) It’s a fact and not much I can do about. At one point, one of the speakers rightly pointed out that the more you sell, the higher the ranking, which leads to more sales. Mind you, he was referring to products not books, but we were first and bestsellers do sell best. Duh.

Advertising

I’ve never tried advertising on Amazon. I wish I could, but they won’t let me. As a non-US entity, I can’t advertise on Amazon and every time I try, I’m met with this lovely fuck-off message: “This account may not purchase licenses for this product due [sic!] country or region restrictions. Please check your country or region settings and try again.” Besides, I readily admit that I wouldn’t even know where to start. It’s like contacting them and getting to talk to a human.

What I did take away from the seminar though was that branding, and focusing your ad money on branding was more important than focusing on pushing product, which feels a bit counter-intuitive until you think about it. Because when others push your wares (aforementioned Amazon), you need to have a strong brand to stand out against the rest, selling similar stuff. Mind you, as authors it’s a little bit different. A book isn’t a phone or a fridge. But there are similarities in that even writers have a brand, and it is important for us to focus on our brand, to cherish it, look after it, cultivate our image.

The speck of light…

 

I'm but a speck of light in the universe...

I’m but a speck of light in the universe…

Which brings me back to the title of this post: who the hell am I to help a reader find my bock in a place filled with over fifty million books? I feel like that one speck of light in the universe and the readers are literally lost in space looking for something. That something I so desperately want to be me? My speck of light? Will they be attracted to the brightest light? The most colorful? Probably a bit of both, and without overstretching the analogy, I can say that this is what I will try and focus on a little more going forward, to build a brand image of myself (inexpensively) to increase the lumen of my brand.

 

Do I have a brand today? I guess I do, but it’s obviously not nearly well known enough, so that’s one aspect. The other is obviously to make sure the connotations associated with me and my writing are such that readers want to read more, can’t wait for the next book.

Breadcrumbs on the way to success: reviews

There are obviously other aspects as well, particularly reviews. I don’t really have to worry about customer service, fulfillment etc, as Amazon handles that for me (and my publisher.) However, I do worry greatly about reviews and the lack thereof. Most people who buy my books do not leave a review, and that is sad because I know. I sold 1,800 books (not much, I know) last year, but only a fraction of those left reviews. I think that is probably my number one goal this year, to get more people to review my work on Amazon. If only 10% of those people had left a review, that would mean 180 reviews. My most reviewed book to date has 37 reviews. Mind you, that would make a HUGE difference. How to get there? That’s a different question altogether. Tips? Always welcome.

I’ll keep thinking about this for a day or two, and who knows, I might come up with more. Some things I know might help (e.g. stick to writing in one genre) I won’t consider. It’s not me. Others I may not be aware of yet.

Why am I still writing books? It’s certainly not a viable job…

Why am I still writing books? It’s certainly not a viable job…

The economy sucks, but I have few alternatives

This weekend I attended a regional book fair a few hundred kilometers north of Gothenburg. It was my second visit. Last year the organizers had asked me to attend and “sponsored” me. I was also able to stay with friends to minimize the cost. Not so much this year. I had sold decently last year and figured I’d do well again this year. Well being about ten books, if memory serves me right. We decided to take the weekend and take our son along, as he loves train rides and hadn’t seen this part of the country. While a fun day and fair for me, financially, it was a bad decision.

The economy of a non-bestselling author

Most people don’t like to talk about money or income. I don’t have much to hide. My royalties are non-existent and I still see (on average) a book or two per day, making my Amazon author rank zig-zag between 30,000 and 250,000. It goes up when I release a book and down again after a while. Every time I sell a book, it goes up drastically. Makes you wonder how many people actually make a living from their writing. I know authors who sell a lot more who still have day jobs. I don’t. More about that (and why) in a minute.

Let’s just have a look at this weekend and the cost I incurred: train ticket, hotel, a table at the conference, the cost of books v the income of books sold. Book fairs are fickle beings. Some years you sell well, some you don’t. This year, a combination of fair weather, plenty of other events and the “unknown” of the visitor composition meant that few people bought books. Writing in English, selling books in the Swedish countryside is challenging as it is, and given that some of my colleagues didn’t sell a single book, I have to be pleased with the two I did sell. However, comparing the cost I incurred (~$458), the revenue of ~$27.50 is a drop in the ocean. Two-thirds of my royalties spent in one weekend.

Why I make these “horrific” financial choices

The indie author's daily reality: money down the drain.

The indie author’s daily reality: money down the drain.

Some might say I’m crazy. They might just be right. Some might not make the same choice. Why do I attend a fair like this, knowing full well that I will never recoup that cost. I will also add here that these events are like best-selling lists. Only a few will ever make money. At the fair this weekend, I reckon one, possibly two authors got their money back, one being the “star” of the show, the main event. Already making money, she likely made even more and was paid to appear. I’m not envious, but as these things go, the book world is a funny place: you need to be famous to get a book deal to make money which you already have, as you’re famous. Alas, it’s the world.

So why do I (and many others) attend these events? What could possibly motivate us to throw away money? Had I not better save that money for a rainier day (e.g. my retirement?) Obviously, I don’t. So why? I think for most authors, our “need” to tell our stories goes far beyond simply writing them. Many of us also invest a lot of money to get these stories published. ONE author in Sweden was lucky enough to be published by Nordic (and global) giant Bonnier last year. One author! I have a hunch that the picture is similar for the remainder of the “big five” (regardless of what country you call “yours”.) The rest of all debutants had to either rely on small niche publishers or self-publishing. Some might even have paid for expensive vanity publishing services. My publisher is a niche publisher, a small indie house, and they make about as much money as I do. The only real income is the love for stories and to be able to read and polish stories, to make them available for a wider public.

I think that applies to me as well. I enjoy meeting readers, to showcase my work, and the joy of someone buying a book (or two as it were) goes a long way. Will I make the same decision again next year, given the meager results? Probably not. But maybe attend another book fair?

An indie author’s drive

Money can’t be our driving force, that is clear. So what is? What keeps us going? Well, I think we have those stories bubble up within us and we just can’t help it. We have to tell them. And just as some people spend thousands of dollars renovating vintage cars, collecting stamps or coins, we spend money making these stories available, regardless of the cost (to a degree anyway.)

The decisions we make to arrive at where we are aren’t driven by what is most economically beneficial to us, or even from a marketing point of view. We often choose covers because they appeal to us, because they’re beautiful, not because they sell. We write blurbs that convey an emotion of the book, not one that hooks people into buying it, and we send our ARCs to those who would’ve bought the book anyway, in hope for a review, thus losing both money (and often enough not seeing a review.) We make decisions regarding our books from a place of love, not a place of making money.

Yet somewhere, in the depth of our subconscious, we all hope that some mysterious agent might pick up our work, that a film studio will stumble across it, despite the handful of reviews on Amazon, and love the story so much they’ll send us a contract worth six-figures to sign us  with all the fame and glory that comes with that. We all do. One in a million actually sees that contract. Just like the American dream, for most, it remains a dream at best.

Are you crazy? Get out and work!

I’m sure that most of the handful of people who will read this post will have this thought on their mind by now: why don’t you get a job? Why don’t you go back to working full-time? The answer isn’t an easy one, and it implies a shameful admission: it’s not as easy as it sounds. Today’s job market is brutal and we compete not just within our own countries but with bright, well-educated people around the world. I’m old, and at fifty-one (soon to be fifty-two) my education isn’t “fresh”. I’m also quite expensive (and no, I can’t call an employer and say that I’ll accept a 28-year old’s wage because they’d think I’m nuts/desperate) in the eyes of an employer given my thirty-year experience on the job market.

I’ve applied for a great number of jobs, both within what the market considers my “core” competencies and within adjacent areas. The result: one interview in three years. I’m either considered over-qualified (aka too old) or I don’t have the right industry background. Add to that that every year that I’ve been writing widens the chasm to the so-called workforce and I’m considered too remote and useless. Spice it up with a pinch of Xeno- and homophobia and my job market is all but the Gobi desert. This is all doing a stellar job on my self-esteem. So I keep writing because I can’t sit still and twiddle my thumbs. I need to work, I need to do something. And yes, I’m keeping my eyes on job adverts, too. I am capable of multi-tasking. 😉

What’s next?

I honestly don’t know. I have no real WIP at this time. No inspiration for the next great Swedish novel (in English.) I’m working on a children’s book, but that’s a long-term project. Short term? Find my inspiration? Make sure my self-worth, my self-esteem and what Americans so often refer to as “confidence” doesn’t plummet further? I don’t want to appear as a pity-party because I’m doing well, especially compared to the millions and millions without a meal on their table, those who lose house and home to natural disasters or those who are constantly under threat from oppressive regimes. Who am I to complain? First-world problems, right?

 

Review: Beat Surrender by Bob Stone

Review: Beat Surrender by Bob Stone

Beat Surrender is an exciting mix of sci-fi and fantasy

I got to read this book, Beat Surrender, by Liverpudlian (yeah, who knew…) author Bob Stone through of our shared publisher, Beaten Track. Recently, they asked for people to proofread Bob’s latest one and since I had the time, I figured why not. Proofing is a somewhat different reading experience, but the book was in such excellent shape that it turned into a very enjoyable experience. For the author me, to find other people making mistakes was very refreshing (and soothing to the old self-esteem), too.

The Cover for Beat Surrender.

The Cover for Beat Surrender.

Beat Surrender is book two in a trilogy about Joey Cale, a young man from the Liverpool area in Northwestern England who ends up in a place he never could’ve dreamed of. Here’s the book’s blurb:

“Something came from somewhere else and crashed onto Trafalgar Square.”

Joey Cale thought he was going home but instead has ended up on another version of Earth just as dangerous as the last.

Aided by his friends, he must discover the cause of one of the greatest disasters Britain has seen. But a threat as old as time is pursuing him and will do anything to stop him.

Who are the sinister Green Jackets? Why are the birds gathering and watching? And what is buried in a wall deep beneath London?

Beat Surrender is the second book in the heart-stopping trilogy which began with Missing Beat.

Excellent read, in fact, a real page-turner

I haven’t read book one, yet, but I’ve purchased it. Therefore, I came somewhat unprepared to Joey’s arrival on the ‘other’ Earth. But even though I haven’t read what happened to him in the first story, I read this book without feeling I was missing things that hindered my enjoyment. I can always go back (which I will) and read the first one to get the background information. It works as a stand-alone. The book is excellently written. I was caught up in the story from page one and read it in three installments, simply because I had to take breaks every now and then to rest my eyes. I was proofreading after all, and I wanted to do Bob justice.

This is science-fiction I like, taking “ordinary” places we are familiar with, but adding a twist to them. No spoilers, but not unlike my own Golden One series, these seemingly regular people are more than meets the eye. While the concept of parallel Earths is one taken from sci-fi (or simply modern physics where the multiverse is a given), the talents our protagonists have are taken from the realm of fantasy. So are the villains.

Varying points of view keep it interesting

The story is told in what I found a most intriguing and captivating way. There are a handful of main protagonists: Joey, Raj and Emma, and about a dozen others who play secondary or tertiary roles. Yet the story is told in a standard chronological order, and every chapter has a different POV, sometimes two, clearly separated for reader comfort. Every chapter links back to the previous one and latches on, almost like a cogwheel, at times repeating a scene partially, but from someone else’s POV. Very well executed.

To heighten tension, new characters are introduced at times, even though they may only be mentioned right there and then. This is a risky endeavor, particularly since Bob can’t really flesh them out. But you don’t really notice, as you are too focused on the plot to wonder about a police officer or ambulance driver’s view of things. I was really impressed!

Yet in the end, the story always gravitates back to the main characters where Joey’s view is the most common one, followed by Raj and Emma.

Book one in the trilogy about Joey Cale, Missing Beat.

Book one in the trilogy about Joey Cale, Missing Beat.

Diverse characters and a very sensitive storytelling

Sometimes when I read books by het authors, I notice how truly blind mainstream WASP society is to the diversity all around them. Without labeling Bob (I truly don’t know, his bio reads as him “living with wife and cat in Liverpool”,) I am deeply impressed with his inclusion of the great diversity of people one will expect to see in the UK: people of color, LGBT, young, old, differently abled. This was, to a degree, not surprising, given that our publisher is specifically labeled as a “diverse publisher”, yet it was still refreshing, deeply satisfying and at the end of the book I felt this enormous gratitude. How often do you read a book that e.g. mentions someone in a wheelchair? I think I can go back on what I’ve read and count those instances on one hand.

The way Bob handles diversity is a true joy and I wish we’d see more of this in literature, even outside the queer community who is, for many reasons, sensitized to it yet often fails this very task, too.

Read Beat Surrender and look forward to the final book in this astounding trilogy

Well first, if you haven’t, you should go back and read book one, Missing Beat, available from all reputable resellers including Bob’s own bookstore in Liverpool. Second, read Beat Surrender. If you like sci-fi and fantasy “light”, with aspects of thriller and crime novel, you’ll absolutely adore this trilogy. I for one am already looking forward to the final book in the trilogy.

I don’t hand out stars or rate the books I read. I simply recommend them. This is a high-quality story, very well written. Be mindful that sometimes, the characters speak the local dialect, which may require you to look up an expression or two, especially if you’re not from England. There is a significant body count aka deaths in this book and a certain amount of violence is depicted. A fair warning to those sensitive to that.

Beat Surrender releases today, March 23, from Beaten Track Publishing as an ebook and as a paperback.