With the manuscript sent to the publisher, it’s time to focus on the next project

In case you don’t know what a writer’s work entails, here’s a quick summary: we write a book, send it to our publisher, wait for edits to come back, then edit the edits, re-write what needs to be fixed and send it back. Follows proof-reading and publishing. If this isn’t your first book, you also spend time marketing previous book(s) and you work on a plan on how to market the new one and you do admin, just like any other job. This is, of course, a simplified view. Writing a book can take anything from a couple of weeks to a lifetime. But when you’re done, and before you embark on your next project is a scary time for some of us, filled with angst, but also joy.

Anxiety and Anticipation rolled up into one? How does that work?

My fantasy novel is the first book in a planned series of three. A story for youths and teens primarily dealing with the big threats our planet is dealing with today.

My fantasy novel is the first book in a planned series of three. A story for youths and teens primarily dealing with the big threats our planet is dealing with today.

I’m not sure I can adequately describe the emotion or the melange of feelings that fill me at a time like this. This is the second time in my short career (I’ve only been writing for six years) that I’ve been in this situation. I submitted book three of my Golden One series to the publisher last week. It’s not due until September, giving me ample time this year to write. There’s nothing that says that any other book of mine will see the markets this year. Two publications are what my publisher musters. So in all likelihood (unless it’s a small project), whatever I write next won’t be published until 2020.

My planned novel about a dystopian future world turned into the opposite: a story about hope and a utopian Earth, five centuries into the future.

My planned novel about a dystopian future world turned into the opposite: a story about hope and a utopian Earth, five centuries into the future.

That gives me time, which is a blessing, a boon. But it’s also scary, for more than one reason. The blessing is that I can go for a long walk in my island’s local forest and just enjoy myself. I can read the placards about stone-age cultures and dream about writing a novel about that or I can be inspired by a sci-fi book I read to write my own hard-core sci-fi novel with starships and aliens. While Willem of the Tafel is a beautiful story of a future Earth, and technically qualifies as sci-fi, it’s not the Star Trek / Wars sci-fi I grew up with. A challenge for sure.

On the other hand, there’s the anxiety of not making any money, not being productive, seeing my husband report for his daytime job every day while I do nothing? You have to actually live through that to understand just how frustrating and emotionally taxing it can be. This isn’t the first time I’m in this position. I recall a period three years ago, after finishing the Jonathan Trilogy when I felt the same way.

The sooner you accept it, the sooner you can be creative again

Only a mock-up, not the real cover, obviously. I should have that in a few weeks, as part of the build-up toward the release in March.

Only a mock-up, not the real cover, obviously. I should have that in a few weeks, as part of the build-up toward the release in March.

One thing I learned from my previous ‘stint’ with anxiety/anticipation is that the sooner I accepted the fact that the emotions were natural and that there was nothing I could do about them except accept them, the sooner I was able to move on and actually write again. I am very proud of the books that followed Jonathan’s Legacy: Last Winter’s Snow, Disease as well as Returning to the Land of the Morning Calm are books I am incredibly proud of. Very different in tone and style, they represent some of my best writing to date.

So while I’m always anxious about the next book (will it be good enough? Will I finally be ousted as the fraud/incompetent writer I am? etc.), I also feel less stressed about it than before. I know that I can continue to write, there isn’t really a lack of ideas, but obviously, some of those will require more research. I can write short stories and I have my children’s book series to work on. The question is more “what” then “when”. The anxiety… LOL

Meanwhile, I enjoy the limbo. I know it won’t last, because the hamster wheel that is a writer’s job (any job, really) implies that before I know it, my publisher will send me the edits to book two of The Golden One–Deceit, and I’ll be knee deep in work again: editing, proofing, marketing. The Golden One–Deceit will hit bookstores on March 17, 2019. That is sooner than I care for…

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